Question: Do dermatologists deal with athlete’s foot?

Do you go to a podiatrist for athlete’s foot?

If you are dealing with persistent or recurring athlete’s foot it’s important that you also have a podiatrist that you can turn to for answers. While this condition may seem harmless it’s important that you don’t leave it untreated. A podiatrist can provide you with the treatment you’re looking for.

What doctor treats severe athlete’s foot?

Your primary care doctor or a skin specialist (dermatologist) can diagnose athlete’s foot.

Do you see a dermatologist for foot fungus?

If your fungus doesn’t clear up at home, you should check in with a dermatologist (a skin, hair, and nail specialist) or podiatrist (a foot doctor.) They may gently scrape under your nail to get rid of some of the fungus or send it to the lab for diagnosis. They can also prescribe stronger medicines. Topical medicines.

How do you cure athlete’s foot in one day?

Like hydrogen peroxide, rubbing alcohol can help kill off the fungus that’s on the surface level of the skin. You can apply it directly to the affected area or soak your feet in a footbath of 70 percent rubbing alcohol and 30 percent water for 30 minutes.

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When should I see a doctor about athlete’s foot?

But any persistent, severe, or recurrent infections should be evaluated by your doctor. When athlete’s foot symptoms appear, you can first use a nonprescription product. If your symptoms do not improve after 2 weeks of treatment or have not gone away after 4 weeks of treatment, call your doctor.

What can mimic athlete’s foot?

Not all fungus conditions are athlete’s foot. Other conditions, such as eczema and psoriasis, may mimic athlete’s foot.

How do doctors treat severe athlete’s foot?

Athlete’s foot can often be treated with over-the-counter (OTC) topical antifungal medications. If OTC medications don’t treat your infection, your doctor may prescribe topical or oral prescription-strength antifungal medications. Your doctor may also recommend home treatments to help clear up the infection.

What does severe athlete’s foot look like?

Athlete’s foot is a term given to almost any inflammatory skin disease that affects the sole of the foot and the skin between the toes. It is usually scaly and maybe a red, raw-appearing eruption with weeping and oozing with small blisters.

What are the stages of athlete’s foot?

The early signs of athlete’s foot are patches or fissures (deep breaks or slits), especially between the toes. As the infection progresses, the skin may turn red, become itchy, and appear moist. Small blisters may spread out across the foot, breaking to expose raw fissures that are painful and may swell.