You asked: Can you use hyaluronic acid with rosacea?

Is hydrochloric acid good for rosacea?

Hyaluronic acid is produced naturally by skin cells to help them retain moisture, and it performs the same function in skin care products. Since rosacea sufferers often have impaired moisture barrier function, moisturizers containing hyaluronic acid may be especially helpful.

What acid is good for rosacea?

Azelaic acid is a compound found in wheat, rye and barley that can help treat acne and rosacea because it soothes inflammation, according to Joshua Zeichner, MD, director of cosmetic and clinical research at Mount Sinai Hospital.

Can you use vitamin C on rosacea?

The best Vitamin C serum for rosacea

Look for an anti-inflammatory Vitamin C serum that’s specifically made for people with rosacea, this will likely contain an ester of Vitamin C such as Ascorbyl Glucoside. A fragrance-free, moisturizing topical serum designed to help soothe irritation and redness is your best bet.

What products are bad for rosacea?

2. Avoid Products That Dry Skin

  • Alcohol.
  • Witch hazel.
  • Menthol.
  • Camphor.
  • Peppermint.
  • Eucalyptus oil.
  • Fragrances.
  • Propylene glycol.

What vitamins are bad for rosacea?

Vitamin B6, Selenium and Magnesium deficiencies result in the dilation of blood vessels, especially on the cheeks and nose. Another common nutritional deficiency in Rosacea is vitamin B12, a large vitamin that requires a carrier molecule for transportation around the body.

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What should I wash my face with if I have rosacea?

Avoid bar soaps (especially deodorant soaps) which can strip your skin of its natural oils. Instead, choose a liquid or creamy cleanser such as Cetaphil Gentle Skin Cleanser, Purpose Gentle Cleansing Wash, or Clinique Comforting Cream Cleanser.

What should you not use hyaluronic acid with?

Second, you should avoid anything with harsh ingredients like alcohol and fragrance or anything with a high acid concentration. “The majority of over-the-counter (OTC) cosmetic creams, lotions, and serums are water-based and contain less than 2% hyaluronic acid,” explains Frey.